Category Archives: New World Order

WHICH SIDE are You On: Rothschild (City) or Treasury (Westminster)?

13 07 03 Bradbury Logo

I shouldn’t be asking the question: which side are you on: Rothschild (City) or Treasury (Westminster)? For the current Treasurer trained in Rothschild banks, as I once read, but can’t find any reference any more…

A lot of us believe that it would be nice if Parliament became an ethical outfit in 2015 and knew what the real issues are:

This is therefore an important email from Justin Walker (jrgwalker@aol.com), the Coordinator for the Restore the Bradbury Pound Campaign:

Hello everyone,

Sorry, but I’ve been doing a lot of quiet thinking/research in the last couple of weeks.   Dangerous I know!  But I would be grateful if you could spread this email out far and wide to get this very important information out, especially as the world will be looking in detail at this period of history next year.

Now I have one big question-mark about the actual 1914 story of the debt-free, HM Treasury-issued Bradbury Pound which has been nagging at me ever since I was first alerted to this little known episode in our country’s history.  It has nothing whatsoever to do with the concept and the principle of a sovereign nation issuing its own debt-free currency based on that nation’s credit.  We all know that the restoration of the Bradbury Pound is our lifeline and trump card to a more sane and prosperous future free from the criminal bankers.

No, the question which is bothering me is WHY did Lloyd George cave in so easily to the bankers by phasing out the issuance of debt-free treasury money in favour of going back to agreeing to debt-creating loans from the private bankers?  What did they have on him which made him cave in so easily to their demands?  Was he frightened?  Possibly.  Was he being blackmailed for his well known penchant and weakness for young women?  Again possibly.  Or was he a part of the game and a ‘sleeper’ for the Rothschild Zionist ambitions for a Jewish ‘homeland’ state in Palestine along with the whole ‘Illuminati‘ satanic globalist approach and agenda to international affairs?  Well, in my opinion, it’s a very real possibility.   In Lloyd George’s war memoirs concerning his actions as Chancellor of the Exchequer, he emphasises that he had an historic disagreement with Lord Rothschild.  On page 104 he writes: Continue reading

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Iceland wants to punish the bankers responsible for the crisis

Iceland, a country that wants to punish the bankers responsible for the crisis

Since 2008 the vast majority of the Western population dream about saying “no” to the banks, but no one has dared to do so. No one except the Icelanders, who have carried out a peaceful revolution that has managed not only to overthrow a government and draft a new constitution, but also seeks to jail those responsible for the country’s economic debacle.

The government sues some bankers. Finally!

The empire of corporate and financial aristocracy is asserting itself increasingly and more blatantly as a dictatorship of Capital

The title is a sentence in this excellent article published by wonderful Global Research.

So where is the democracy? Austerity budgets imposed against public will, a deficit substantially increased from a royal pageant imposed without democratic consultation, and war expenses loaded on to the suffering public – even though these wars are opposed by the majority of voters.

But the royal wedding is not just a peculiar Big Day for the seemingly quaint House of Windsor. It is in many ways a celebration of the dictatorship of global Capital over democracy in Britain and elsewhere around the world, including the ‘Republic of the USA”. As the assorted global dictators assembled in London’s  Westminster Abbey might say in harmony with the happy couple: “Till death do us part”.

We cannot allow these globalist people to be running the world anymore; they have no right to govern this planet any longer.” Yoichi Shimatsu

Yoichi Shimatsu former editor of the weekly Japan Times is interviewed on Rense Radio, discussing the dire situation of Fukushima, saying the the sea emissions, alone could lead to the largest mammalian extinction event since the Stone Age, where the oceans’ dolphins and whales could go the way of the  woolly mammoth, the saber-toothed cats and the American camel.

Shiumatsu concludes:

“… we cannot allow these globalist people to be running the world anymore, I mean look at what they are doing, they are on a death wish, they are in denial, they have no right to govern this planet any longer.” — Yoichi Shimatsu

Video:
http://www.forbiddenknowledgetv.com/page/1537.html

America ain’t broke! The only thing that’s broke is the moral compass of the rulers

This phrase comes from a speech that Michael Moore held in Madison, Winconsin on Saturday, 5th March, 2011, with the video here.

Here are a few gems:

None of us know what the exact, specific outcome of all of this is going to be. We have a good feeling about it though.

America is not broke.

… the banks and the portfolios of the uber-rich…

… a financial coup d’etat…

… we have surrendered our precious democracy to the money elite: Wall Street, the Banks and the Fortune 500 now run this Republic!

They KNOW they have committed crimes to make this happen.

They control the message – by owning the media: their version of the American dream.

We have had it! And we are all Wisconsinites now!

A little bit of Egypt here, and a bit of Madison there.

One thing is for certain: Madison is only the beginning. The rich have overplayed their hand.

To the media who are here: please tell the story correctly!

United, not Corporate States of America!

Don’t give up! Please don’t give up!

Contrary to what those in power would like you to believe so that you’ll give up your pension, cut your wages, and settle for the life your great-grandparents had, America is not broke. Not by a long shot. The country is awash in wealth and cash. It’s just that it’s not in your hands. It has been transferred, in the greatest heist in history, from the workers and consumers to the banks and the portfolios of the uber-rich.

Today just 400 Americans have the same wealth as half of all Americans combined.

Let me say that again. 400 obscenely rich people, most of whom benefited in some way from the multi-trillion dollar taxpayer “bailout” of 2008, now have as much loot, stock and property as the assets of 155 million Americans combined. If you can’t bring yourself to call that a financial coup d’état, then you are simply not being honest about what you know in your heart to be true.

And I can see why. For us to admit that we have let a small group of men abscond with and hoard the bulk of the wealth that runs our economy, would mean that we’d have to accept the humiliating acknowledgment that we have indeed surrendered our precious Democracy to the moneyed elite. Wall Street, the banks and the Fortune 500 now run this Republic — and, until this past month, the rest of us have felt completely helpless, unable to find a way to do anything about it.

I have nothing more than a high school degree. But back when I was in school, every student had to take one semester of economics in order to graduate. And here’s what I learned: Money doesn’t grow on trees. It grows when we make things. It grows when we have good jobs with good wages that we use to buy the things we need and thus create more jobs. It grows when we provide an outstanding educational system that then grows a new generation of inventors, entrepreneurs, artists, scientists and thinkers who come up with the next great idea for the planet. And that new idea creates new jobs and that creates revenue for the state. But if those who have the most money don’t pay their fair share of taxes, the state can’t function. The schools can’t produce the best and the brightest who will go on to create those jobs. If the wealthy get to keep most of their money, we have seen what they will do with it: recklessly gamble it on crazy Wall Street schemes and crash our economy. The crash they created cost us millions of jobs.  That too caused a reduction in tax revenue. Everyone ended up suffering because of what the rich did.

The nation is not broke, my friends. Wisconsin is not broke. Saying that the country is broke is repeating a Big Lie. It’s one of the three biggest lies of the decade: 1) America is broke, 2) Iraq has WMD, and 3) The Packers can’t win the Super Bowl without Brett Favre.

The truth is, there’s lots of money to go around. LOTS. It’s just that those in charge have diverted that wealth into a deep well that sits on their well-guarded estates. They know they have committed crimes to make this happen and they know that someday you may want to see some of that money that used to be yours. So they have bought and paid for hundreds of politicians across the country to do their bidding for them. But just in case that doesn’t work, they’ve got their gated communities, and the luxury jet is always fully fueled, the engines running, waiting for that day they hope never comes. To help prevent that day when the people demand their country back, the wealthy have done two very smart things:

1. They control the message. By owning most of the media they have expertly convinced many Americans of few means to buy their version of the American Dream and to vote for their politicians. Their version of the Dream says that you, too, might be rich some day — this is America, where anything can happen if you just apply yourself! They have conveniently provided you with believable examples to show you how a poor boy can become a rich man, how the child of a single mother in Hawaii can become president, how a guy with a high school education can become a successful filmmaker. They will play these stories for you over and over again all day long so that the last thing you will want to do is upset the apple cart — because you — yes, you, too! — might be rich/president/an Oscar-winner some day! The message is clear: keep you head down, your nose to the grindstone, don’t rock the boat and be sure to vote for the party that protects the rich man that you might be some day.

2. They have created a poison pill that they know you will never want to take. It is their version of mutually assured destruction. And when they threatened to release this weapon of mass economic annihilation in September of 2008, we blinked. As the economy and the stock market went into a tailspin, and the banks were caught conducting a worldwide Ponzi scheme, Wall Street issued this threat: Either hand over trillions of dollars from the American taxpayers or we will crash this economy straight into the ground. Fork it over or it’s Goodbye savings accounts. Goodbye pensions. Goodbye United States Treasury. Goodbye jobs and homes and future. It was friggin’ awesome and it scared the shit out of everyone. “Here! Take our money! We don’t care. We’ll even print more for you! Just take it! But, please, leave our lives alone, PLEASE!”

The executives in the board rooms and hedge funds could not contain their laughter, their glee, and within three months they were writing each other huge bonus checks and marveling at how perfectly they had played a nation full of suckers. Millions lost their jobs anyway, and millions lost their homes. But there was no revolt (see #1).

Until now. On Wisconsin! Never has a Michigander been more happy to share a big, great lake with you! You have aroused the sleeping giant known as the working people of the United States of America. Right now the earth is shaking and the ground is shifting under the feet of those who are in charge. Your message has inspired people in all 50 states and that message is: WE HAVE HAD IT! We reject anyone who tells us America is broke and broken. It’s just the opposite! We are rich with talent and ideas and hard work and, yes, love. Love and compassion toward those who have, through no fault of their own, ended up as the least among us. But they still crave what we all crave: Our country back! Our democracy back! Our good name back! The United States of America. NOT the Corporate States of America. The United States of America!

So how do we make this happen? Well, we do it with a little bit of Egypt here, a little bit of Madison there. And let us pause for a moment and remember that it was a poor man with a fruit stand in Tunisia who gave his life so that the world might focus its attention on how a government run by billionaires for billionaires is an affront to freedom and morality and humanity.

Thank you, Wisconsin. You have made people realize this was our last best chance to grab the final thread of what was left of who we are as Americans. For three weeks you have stood in the cold, slept on the floor, skipped out of town to Illinois — whatever it took, you have done it, and one thing is for certain: Madison is only the beginning. The smug rich have overplayed their hand. They couldn’t have just been content with the money they raided from the treasury. They couldn’t be satiated by simply removing millions of jobs and shipping them overseas to exploit the poor elsewhere. No, they had to have more — something more than all the riches in the world. They had to have our soul. They had to strip us of our dignity. They had to shut us up and shut us down so that we could not even sit at a table with them and bargain about simple things like classroom size or bulletproof vests for everyone on the police force or letting a pilot just get a few extra hours sleep so he or she can do their job — their $19,000 a year job. That’s how much some rookie pilots on commuter airlines make, maybe even the rookie pilot who flew me here to Madison today. He told me he’s stopped hoping for a pay increase. All he’s asking for now is enough down time so that he doesn’t have to sleep in his car between shifts at O’Hare airport. That’s how despicably low we have sunk! The wealthy couldn’t be content with just paying this man $19,000 a year. They had to take away his sleep. They had to demean him and dehumanize him and rub his face in it. After all, he’s just another slob, isn’t he?

And that, my friends, is Corporate America’s fatal mistake. But trying to destroy us they have given birth to a movement — a movement that is becoming a massive, nonviolent revolt across the country. We all knew there had to be a breaking point some day, and that point is upon us. Many people in the media don’t understand this. They say they were caught off guard about Egypt, never saw it coming. Now they act surprised and flummoxed about why so many hundreds of thousands have come to Madison over the last three weeks during brutal winter weather. “Why are they all standing out there in the cold?” I mean, there was that election in November and that was supposed to be that!

“There’s something happening here, and you don’t know what it is, do you …?”

America ain’t broke! The only thing that’s broke is the moral compass of the rulers. And we aim to fix that compass and steer the ship ourselves from now on. Never forget, as long as that Constitution of ours still stands, it’s one person, one vote, and it’s the thing the rich hate most about America — because even though they seem to hold all the money and all the cards, they begrudgingly know this one unshakeable basic fact: There are more of us than there are of them!

Madison, do not retreat.  We are with you. We will win together.

Gods of Money: Wall Street and the Death of the American Century

Two reviews of one new book:

1. by the remarkable analyst and web publisher Richard Moore
If you want to understand who has power in the world today, and how it got that way, this book is a must-read. It is clear, concise, comprehensive, and every detail is meticulously documented with reliable references. I’ve been studying this kind of material for years, and from this book I learned quite a few things I had never come across before.

At one level, the book is about the power of finance, focusing particularly on Wall Street and the Federal Reserve. At another level, it’s about geopolitics over the past century, and how that has been related to the power of finance. At another level it’s about the Rockefeller dynasty, which has been the dominant power in the world ever since the creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913.

Even if you are already an expert on such matters, I still say read this book. You will be glad you did. Below is a more detailed review, that appeared in New Dawn magazine.

best wishes,
rkm (Richard K Moore)
__________

2. by Reg Little, a former Australian diplomat
William Engdahl’s latest book is another awesome exploration and explanation of the boldness and failings of Anglo-American global strategy over most of the past century and a half. Engdahl recalls in his introduction a statement from the 1970’s attributed to then-Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, a protégé of the powerful Rockefeller circles, in which he declared, “If you control the oil, you control entire nations; if you control the food, you control the people; if you control the money, you control the entire world.”

With Gods of Money, Engdahl completes the trilogy, which with A Century of War: Anglo-American Oil Politics and the New World Order, and Seeds of Destruction: The Hidden Agenda of Genetic Manipulation explores the ways in which the Rockefellers and the people around them would appear to have sought to control oil, food and money in seeking to establish their sense of global order.

For anyone interested in the contemporary world, its politics and its tragedies, Engdahl’s books are obligatory reading. He explains the reasons for linking Abraham Lincoln’s assassination to British and European banking interests but shows how, as wealth concentrated into the hands of a few American families, notably those of the Morgans and Rockefellers, the United States developed a remarkable strategy that concentrated power through the mastery of global finance, backed by military expedience. Like a growing number of other writers, however, he leaves no doubt that this strategy has run into serious troubles, devastating Americans as much as the intended subjects of American Empire, or of a New American Century.

He highlights early the reality that “power, together with control over the nation’s economy, was being ruthlessly centralized in the hands of the wealthy few, every bit as much as it had been in the days of Imperial Rome.” In fleshing out this theme Engdahl leaves little doubt that the values of the European Enlightenment, with which America has promoted itself to the world, have simply been a useful disguise for a rapacious plutocracy.

He puts in brutally in these words:

“Some 60 families–names like Rockefeller, Morgan, Dodge, Mellon, Pratt, Harkness, Whitney, Duke, Harriman, Carnegie, Vanderbilt, DuPont, Guggenheim, Astor, Lehman, Warburg, Taft, Huntington, Baruch and Rosenwald– formed a close network of plutocratic wealth that manipulated, bribed, and bullied its way to control the destiny of the United States.”

He continues:

“They operated in absolute secrecy, lest the general public understand how the banks’ money manipulated political decisions behind the scenes, including decisions to go to war or to keep the peace.”

The shock of these passages rests in the realization that these forces defined the 20th Century and are threatening various disasters for large populations at the beginning of the 21st Century, and yet remain largely unidentified in the mind of the voting electorate. Central to the story are the consequences of the legislation that established the Federal Reserve in 1913, placing it under the control of private bankers able to access the taxes of ordinary citizens

Also central to the story was the use by the United States of the challenge posed to Britain by the rise of Germany to assume the dominant role in global finance and politics. Germany’s industrial growth, its educational system and its science were already leaving England far behind. The dominant role of the City of London over the terms of world trade was lost to the United States in the two great wars of the 20th Century.

A central element of the story was the “extraordinary techniques of mass manipulation of opinion” initiated during World War I, which “greatly assisted the transformation of America into a democracy by-outward-appearance, ruled deceptively by a plutocratic elite in its own self interest”.

Engdahl draws attention to the fact that “America was to be an empire in much the same way that Great Britain had been an Empire after 1815, with one significant difference. America’s economic
imperialism would disguise itself under the rhetorical cover of ` spreading free enterprise,’ and supporting `national self-determination’ and `democracy.’ The term `empire’ was to be scrupulously avoided.”

He captures the quality of American political strategy in several paragraphs:

“The policy makers from the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) and the internationalists around the Rockefeller group engaged in seemingly paradoxical and contradictory policies. They were simultaneously financing and staffing the CFR War & Peace Studies–intended to be a detailed blueprint for a postwar US global domination, an American Century–while at the same time they were going to extraordinary lengths supporting the Third Reich’s war buildup, accruing huge profits from the sales to their `enemy’ that soared far beyond anything normal. It appeared that Rockefellers’ Standard Oil and allied companies like Dow Chemical and DuPont went to extraordinary lengths to support Hitler’s war machine.

“The resolution to the paradox lay in appreciating American geopolitical strategy as formulated by people like Isaiah Bowman of the CFR and Yale University’s geopolitical strategist, Nicholas Spykman. They had developed a uniquely American synthesis of Halford Mackinder’s British geopolitics -identifying the most vital, `pivotal’ nations needed for the support of an American postwar global domination, an American Empire.

“For the influential US elites grouped around the CFR, war was merely an instrument through which to extend their financial power in the postwar world and create an American imperium, one displacing not only the British Empire, but also the German Reich and any other potential European competitor.”

As Engdahl’s account progresses, it becomes clear that America repeated Britain’s mistake in neglecting to develop a leadership role in industry, education and science. This left it vulnerable, of course, not to Germany but to the economies of East Asia, beginning with Japan and concluding with China. Engdahl shows how American strategists focused on financial manipulation and how they neglected any concern with American decline in industrial, educational and scientific competitiveness. This made inevitable and predictable the off-shoring of American industry, something that remains poorly, if at all, understood in America. It is, of course well understood in Japan, China and elsewhere in Asia.

Engdhal recounts how Americans believed propaganda that asserted America’s God-given `Manifest Destiny’ and `Divine Right” to expand its frontiers and plunder other countries. He notes how for “the Rockefellers, the most prominent proponent of the Manifest Destiny idea in the post-war period, the entire world was considered their `frontier.'” The Cold War was fought by `American democracy’ against `Godless Communism’ and gave the advance of American interests “a messianic religious cover that was astonishingly effective for decades.”

Paired with this propaganda mechanism was the construction of new International Financial Institutions after the Second World War, where the IMF become the global financial `policeman,’ under the control of America and, to a lesser degree, Britain. This was used to enforce the payment of “usurious debts through imposition of the most draconian austerity in history.” The IMF became an arm of “a de facto Anglo-American neo-colonial monetary and economic dictatorship”. `Free trade’ and a `level playing field’ continued to be “the rallying cry of the strongest, most advanced economies, seeking to open up less developed markets for their goods.”

The price was, however, America’s industrial base went into terminal decline and the nation’s most talented scientific minds were drawn into Wall Street. The consequence of all this is today all too clear to see. Over forty years, the financial sector’s share of total profits has grown from 2% to 40%, as industrial output has declined, education has deteriorated, technology has stagnated and indebtedness has exploded.

The system was maintained by Wall Street expenditure of at least $5 billion from 1998 to 2008 “buying the votes of the US Congress through campaign contributions and `lobbying’ expenses.”
A former US bank regulator, William Black, noted that

“Corporate stock repurchases and grants of stock to officers have exceeded new capital raised by the US capital markets this decade. That means that the capital markets decapitalize the real economy. Too often, they do so in order to enrich corrupt corporate insiders through accounting fraud or backdated stock options….The US real economy suffers from critical shortages of employees with strong mathematical, engineering, and scientific backgrounds. Graduates in these three fields all too frequently choose careers in finance rather than the real economy because the financial sector provides far greater executive compensation…. The financial sector’s fixation on accounting earnings leads it to pressure US manufacturing and service firms to export jobs abroad, to deny capital to firms that are unionized, and to encourage firms to use foreign tax havens to evade paying US taxes.”

Yet, between 2000 and 2007 American consumption made up one third of growth in global consumption. This highlights the manner in which American abuse of its global power in organizations like the IMF harmed the United States as much as anyone, although in a unique manner. Indeed, by 2009, one estimate put America’s annual deficit at more than $5 trillion.

Engdahl concludes with a review of the decline of the Roman Empire, a process that took much longer than now seems likely with American Empire. He remarks pertinently on paid professional career soldiers, on unpopular distant wars, on gaining citizenship in exchange for military service, and on an increasingly degenerate oligarchy.

He recalls that the American Century had been based as had Rome on a system of looting and plunder of foreign lands. It took a different form, of course, in using the supranational technocrats of the IMF to plunder the wealth of countries from Latin America to Africa while simultaneously exploiting the world’s reserve currency. Being an unchallenged military superpower, it has enjoyed consumption far beyond what its internal economy could have sustained and has used a “free-floating dollar and virtual money in the form of financial derivatives to maintain a facade of solvency.”

— REG LITTLE was an Australian diplomat for over 25 years. He is the author of A Confucian-Daoist Millennium? This review appeared in New Dawn 121 (Jul-Aug 2010), www.newdawnmagazine.com

Banking, Finance and the Money System

There’s a 39-page document that landed in my mailbox. Whilst it has been compiled with Australians in mind, it applies to absolutely everybody in our world. After all, “globalisation” is the name of the game…